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Learning American Sign Language 2nd Edition

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Learning American Sign Language 2nd Edition eBook And DVDs

Author:Tom L. Humphries
Carol A. Padden
Year:2004
Language:English
ISBN 13:978-0205275533
Publisher:Pearson Education, Inc.
ISBN 10:9780205275533
Pages:357
File:PDF; MP4.
Price:35.99$
Digital delivery:Via Email Check SPAM box

Learning American Sign Language 2nd Edition eBook & All Videos From DVD

you are now beginning to learn American Sign Language (ASL), the sign language used by Deaf people in the United States and parts of Canada. It is important to note that you are learning American Sign Language because there are many sign languages throughout the world that differ in structure and vocabulary from one another. As you learn about ASL in this book, you will also be learning about the culture of Deaf people in the United States.

Learning American Sign Language is structured to help you learn American Sign Language by presenting the vocabulary and sentences needed to
communicate in common life situations. The sentence structures you need to learn are shown in context-that is, the grammar and vocabulary are tied together in some meaningful communicative situation. Notes discuss particular structures and rules that help you to master this language as well as give you cultural information for your interaction with Deaf American Sign Language users.

You should be aware that this book is not intended to be self-instructional. No ebook can be truly self-instructional when the objective is to learn a language that uses gesture and vision. However, the illustrations and exercises in this book will help you to recall and practice what your teacher has presented to you in _class or what you have seen on practice videos. This book serves a purpose for which textbooks are ideally suited: to be a resource and reference for your ongoing study when no model of American Sign Language is present to demonstrate the language to you.

As with any other language, the amount of exposure you have to the functional use of this language will help determine the speed at which you master it. Realistically, American Sign Language cannot be learned in a few weeks. The vocabulary and structures presented in this book require two semesters or three-quarters of study. However, your fluency will depend on the number of class hours and the amount of interaction with users of this language that you have during your time of study.

The units of this book have a simple design. Each unit has a topic and is divided into subtopics. Each subtopic has a short dialogue that presents you with the structures and vocabulary of a real communicative situation. Key structures on which you should focus are selected from these dialogues and illustrated; some are discussed in short notes. Each unit has exercises that allow you to practice these useful structures. And finally, in each unit, there is a vocabulary list that is organized into categories for more effective study.

There are a few things you need to know to use this book. English translations of the American Sign Language sentences and vocabulary are given to help you understand the ranges of meaning for signs, but selecting exactly equivalent translations is very difficult, as often a change in the situational context will produce a different translation. Your teacher will be able to offer alternative translations that are equally suitable. Translations cannot be done on a “one word for one sign” basis. Sometimes a single sign requires several English words to translate it adequately or, conversely, a single English word requires several signs Master ASL Level One.

Signs are illustrated and labeled with capitalized English words. For example, the sign translated as “tree” is labeled TREE. This is a common way to label signs because there is no other widely accepted system for representing signs in print. The shortcoming of this system is that many signs do have multiple meanings or a wider range of meaning than the one- or two-word label assigned to it. Therefore, you should try to be aware of the full range of meaning of a sign rather than just that represented by the English label. In some places, signs that look exactly alike are assigned different labels because to assign them the same label would be confusing to you. Although using these English labels to represent signs may be a bit confusing at times, you should become accustomed to this convention and it will be less distracting.

As previously mentioned, sometimes a single sign requires a two- or three-word label. When this is done, the words are joined by hyphens as in NOT-YET. These two words joined by a hyphen represent just one sign. Hyphens are also used to join letters that represent fingerspelling used by American Sign Language users. Fingerspelling is a system of hand configurations that represent letters of the alphabet that are formed to spell out names or words. Therefore, J-0-H-N represents the fingerspelled letters of the name “John.” Other symbols are explained as they appear in the units. Your teacher will also be able to explain what these symbols represent. You will become used to them after a while.

On the inside front and back covers, you will find the fingerspelling and numbers system used in ASL. At the end of this ebook, you will find a vocabulary index that will help you to find illustrations of signs in the text. You will find English translations of the ASL dialogues at the end of the book as well.

American Sign Language is a rich and complex language. Recently declared as an official language and recognized by 48 states as a foreign language, more and more high school teachers across the country are teaching American Sign Language as an elective.

Learning American Sign Language: Levels I & II – Beginning &Intermediate is designed to prepare teachers to successfully interact with American Sign Language (ASL) users. Lessons are structured around language needed for common life situations, and examples are presented in the form of dialogues coupled with grammar and vocabulary instruction. Information is also included about the culture of deaf people in the United States.

Learners will discover that the ebook:

  • Contains lessons designed around the conversational language needed for common life situations.
  • Illustrates hundreds of sentences and vocabulary with over 2,000 high-quality colorized drawings that aid in study and memory.
  • Contains over 100 grammar and cultural notes, 72 exercises, and charts of the American Manual Alphabet (Finger spelling) and ASL number system.
  • Teaches the rules of ASL in a natural order that is predictable and compatible with the everyday language of native users of American Sign Language.
  • Incorporates information about the cultural lives of Deaf people in the United States.
  • Is supported by a video demonstrating all the conversations and important structures in the text.

Order the Video!
Video to Accompany American Sign Language, 2/e
American Sign Language students will find themselves captivated and entertained by this state-of-the-art Video that presents all 72 dialogues and each key structure from the text clearly and naturally. Four internationally known Deaf actors animate the dialogues bringing life to the illustrations in the text allowing students to preview and review instructional materials at home to enhance their classroom learning.

Table Of CONTENTS:

To the Student
Acknowledgments
Sign Models

UNIT 1 Introductions and Personal Information
Introductions
Grammar: Information questions
Culture: Using first and last names in introductions
Personal Information
Grammar: Yes/No questions
Grammar: Simple affirmative sentences with head-nodding
Grammar: Simple negative sentences with head shaking
Culture: DEAF, Deaf people’s term for themselves
More Personal Information
Grammar: Repeating pronouns
Culture: Difference between WHERE LIVE? and WHERE FROM?
Vocabulary

UNIT 2 Learning ASL
Going to Class
Grammar: Answering yes/no questions by repeating the verb from the question
Grammar: THERE made in the approximate direction of place even when not insight and to show specific location; also HERE
Objects in the Classroom
Grammar: Information questions: question sign before, after, or both before and after
Showing You Understand and Asking for Help
Note: Other ways to ask for help
Note: Use of OH-1-SEE
Vocabulary

UNIT 3 Politeness
Asking Politely
Grammar: Verbs that change movement to show location: GO/COME, BRING/CARRY, etc
Thanks
Grammar: Verbs that change movement to indicate subject and object: GIVE, HELP, TELL, etc
Interruptions and Apologies
Culture: Saying EXCUSE-ME when walking between two people
Vocabulary

UNIT 4 Descriptions
Physical Appearance
Grammar: LOOK” LIKE? questions
Grammar: Adjectives used to describe hair
Grammar: Adjectives used to describe height and weight
Clothing
Grammar: Descriptive adjectives before and after nouns
Grammar: Altering signs to show detail such as the direction of stripes, etc
Personality and Character
Grammar: Topicalizing subjects and objects
Vocabulary

UNIT 5 Requests
Polite Commands
Culture: Flashing lights to get attention and other ways to get attention
Grammar: Verb pairs: Requests OPEN/CLOSE-DOOR, etc
Grammar: Noun-verb pairs
Requests to Do Something
Note: Use of DON’T MIND
Note: Use of FOR ME
More Requests
Note: Verb pairs involving turning things on and off
Vocabulary

UNIT 6 Expressing Yourself
How You Feel
Note: Form of ALL-DAY, ALL-NIGHT, etc
Opinions and Preferences
Note: Use of WOW!
Grammar: Negative incorporation: DON’T-LIKE, DON’T-KNOW, DON’T WANT.
Grammar: Other negative forms: NOT SURPRISED I, NOT SATISFIED I, etc
Anxiety
Grammar: Use of modals: MUST, SHOULD, CAN WILL
Vocabulary

UNIT 7 More Descriptions
Objects and Their Location
Grammar: Classifier predicates showing size and shape
Grammar: Classifier predicates showing instrument to indicate movement
Objects, Number, and Location
Grammar: Classifier predicates to indicate locational relationships
How Many
Grammar: Plurals using quantifiers: MANY, SOME, SEVERAL, A-FEW
Grammar: Plurals using numbers
Grammar: MINUTE, HOUR, DAY, etc. incorporating numbers
Vocabulary

UNIT 8 Family and Friends
Family Information
Culture: Asking and giving information about a person’s family background
Culture: Establishing whether hearing members of a family sign or not
Family Relationships
Grammar: Past, present, and future tenses using time signs
Grammar: Personal pronouns incorporating a number
Friends and Acquaintances
Note: Use of FINISH
Vocabulary

UNIT 9 More Descriptions
How Others Look
Note: Whispering in sign
Grammar: Use of numbers to show age, time, count
Note: Humorous variation on CL:5 5
Personality
Grammar: Contraction of KNOW and THAT: KNOW THAT
Culture: Schools for the Deaf
Physical Features
Grammar: Variation on CL: B
Vocabulary

UNIT 10 At Home and Daily Living
Your ResidenceGrammar: More verbs that change movement to show subject and object: BORROW, TAKE, SUMMON, CHOOSE
Grammar: Classifiers representing category and with movement
Objects in Your Residence
Grammar: More classifiers showing size and shape and outline: CL: C=4, CL: B, CL:11
What You Do Every Day
Grammar: Form of EVERY-MORNING, EVERY-NIGHT, etc
Note: Signs derived from fingerspelling
Grammar: Form of EVERY-SATURDAY, EVERY-TUESDAY, etc
Vocabulary

UNIT 11 Food and Food Shopping
The Menu
Note: Use of RUN-OUT and DEPLETE (for containers)
Grammar: Negatives of modals: CAN’T and WON’T
Grammar: Use of NONE to show no quantity and as a negative: SEE11NONE, HEAR11NONE, UNDERSTAND11NONE
Quantities
Note: Fingerspelled abbreviations: L-B, 0-Z, D-0-Z, T-S-P
Grammar: Classifiers CL: G and CL: BB to show thickness, width, and depth
Prices
Grammar: 1-DOLLAR incorporating numbers 2 to 10
Note: Use of BLANK with the dollar amount
Grammar: 1-CENT incorporating numbers
Vocabulary

UNIT 12 Offering and Declining
Food and Drink
Grammar: Non-inflecting form of HELP
Offering Help
Culture: TIYs, pagers, and email
Note: Use of BREAKDOWN, SHUTDOWN, WEAR-OUT, BREAK
Declining and Explaining
Grammar: Structures for declining
Vocabulary

UNIT 13 More Ways to Express Yourself
Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction
Note: Ways to express satisfaction
Agreement and Disagreement
Grammar: Conditional sentences
Concern and Feelings
Note: Asking about someone: ALL-RIGHT? etc
Note: Use of GONE and DIE
Grammar: Structures to express emotional or physical states
Vocabulary

UNIT 14 Experiences and Current Activity
An Event
Grammar: Classifiers as quantifiers: CL:44, CL:55, etc
Grammar: FINISH as the conjunction
A Past Event
Grammar: More conjunctions: WRONG, HAPPEN, FIND, FRUSTRATED, HIT
Grammar: Number incorporation in LAST-YEAR, NEXT-YEAR, etc
Grammar: Structures for asking what happened: WHAT’S-UP? etc
Current Activity
Grammar: Structures for commenting on competence or expertise
Vocabulary

UNIT 15 Future Plans and Obligations
General Future Plans
Note: Use of NOTHING-TO-IT
Time and Place to Meet
Grammar: More verb pairs: GET-IN/GET-OUT, etc
Future Obligations
Grammar: Structures for indicating an obligation: APPOINTMENT, PROMISE, DUTY
Culture: Captioned video, TV, films
Culture: Deaf clubs
Vocabulary

UNIT 16 Directions and Instructions
Directions
Note: Commonly used fingerspelled abbreviations: D-S and P-0
Grammar: Use of body to show a change in direction
Descriptions of Places
Note: Use of apostrophe-S
Grammar: Use of LOCALE
Grammar: Location relationships using chaining of classifiers
Instructions
Grammar: Use of CL: CC**
Vocabulary

UNIT 17 Suggestions and Advice
Suggestions
Note: Use of BORED
Culture: Bowling leagues
Grammar: Forms of EVERY-MONTH, EVERY-YEAR
Time and Place
Note: Confirming head nods and head shakes
Note: Use of APPROXIMATELY with time, age, and money
Advice
Grammar: Structure for giving advice preceded by SHOULD, BETTER, ADVISE, WARN, SUGGEST, MAYBE
Vocabulary

UNIT 18 Attitudes and Opinions
What Others Think
Grammar: Verbs that change movement to indicate TWO, EACH, ALL.
Opinions
Note: More ways to express opinions
Values
Note: Ways to express opposing values
Grammar: Quantifiers with count and non-count nouns
Vocabulary

UNIT 19 Recreational Activities
Activities
Grammar: REPEATEDLY inflection of verbs, with facial adverbs
A Sequence of Activities
Grammar: CONTINUALLY inflection of verbs, with facial adverbs
Note: Use of CHAT, SIGN-TALK, and SIGN-FLUENTLY
Seasonal Activities
Grammar: Plural forms by reduplication
Vocabulary

UNIT 20 Travel-Places and Experiences
Travel Experience
Grammar: Other verbs showing subject and object: JOIN and SAY-OKAY
Grammar: REPEATEDLY inflection of adjectives
More Travel Experience
Grammar: CONTINUALLY inflection of adjectives
Places You Visited
Grammar: VERY inflection of adjectives
Vocabulary

UNIT 21 Occupations and Professions
Occupations and Professions
Grammar: Use of agent suffix for some professions
Grammar: Rhetorical questions
Job Activity
Note: Use of UNDERSTAND to precede a qualification, condition, or stipulation
Work History
Note: Use of GET-REGULARLY
Vocabulary

UNIT 22 The Body, Health, and Emergencies
Physical Conditioning
Grammar: Use of body pronoun
Health and Health Problems
Note: Use of PAIN
Emergencies
Culture: Deaf people’s communicative strategies with non-signers
Grammar: Use of NEVER and NOTHING as denials
Vocabulary

UNIT 23 Current Events
Recent News
Grammar: Reduplication in different locations
Current Topics of Interest
Grammar: Clause as a topic
Current Issues
Note: Use of WORSE
Vocabulary

UNIT 24 How Things Are Done
A Process
Grammar: Classifier predicates showing the manner of flow: CL:44::::t and CL:4t
Width, Length, and Height
Grammar: Distance from one point to another using CL:1-TO-CL:1
Measurements and Weight
Grammar: Questions about measurement: HOW-MUCH, etc
Vocabulary

English Translations of Dialogues
Vocabulary Index

CONTENTS Language Notes:

UNIT 1 Introductions and Personal Information
Information questions
Yes/No questions
Simple affirmative sentences with head-nodding
Simple negative sentences with head shaking
Repeating pronouns

UNIT 2 Learning ASL
Answering yes-no questions by repeating the verb from the question
THERE made in the approximate direction of place even when not insight and to show specific location; also HERE
Information questions: question sign before, after, or both before and after
Other ways to ask for help
Use of OH-1-SEE

UNIT 3 Politeness
Verbs that change movement to show location: GO/COME, BRING/CARRY, etc
Verbs that change movement to indicate subject and object: GIVE, HELP, TELL, etc

UNIT 4 Descriptions
LOOK” LIKE? questions
Adjectives used to describe hair
Adjectives used to describe height and weight
Descriptive adjectives before and after nouns
Altering signs to show detail such as the direction of stripes, etc
Topicalizing subjects and objects

UNIT 5 Requests
Verb pairs: Requests OPEN/CLOSE-DOOR, etc
Noun-verb pairs
Use of DON’T-MIND
Use of FOR ME
Verb pairs involving turning things on and off

UNIT 6 Expressing Yourself
Form of ALL-DAY, ALL-NIGHT, etc
Use of WOW!
Negative incorporation: DON’T-LIKE, DON’T-KNOW, DON’T-WANT
Other negative forms: NOT SURPRISED I, NOT SATISFIED I, etc
Use of modals: MUST, SHOULD, CAN, WILL

UNIT 7 More Descriptions
Classifier predicates showing size and shape
Classifier predicates showing instrument to indicate movement
Classifier predicates to indicate the location and I relationships
Plurals using quantifiers: MANY, SOME, SEVERAL, A-FEW
Plurals using numbers
MINUTE, HOUR, DAY, etc. incorporating numbers
UNIT 8 Family and Friends
Past, present, and future tenses using time signs
Personal pronouns incorporating a number
Use of FINISH

UNIT 9 More Descriptions
Whispering in sign
Use of numbers to show age, time, count
A humorous variation on CL:55
Contraction of KNOW and THAT: KNOW” THAT
A variation on CL: B

UNIT 10 At Home and Daily Living
More verbs that change movement to show subject and object: BORROW, TAKE, SUMMON, CHOOSE
Classifiers representing category and with movement
More classifiers showing size and shape and outline: CL: C~, CL: B, CL:11
Form of EVERY-MORNING, EVERY-NIGHT, etc
Signs derived from fingerspelling
Form of EVERY-SATURDAY, EVERY-TUESDAY, etc

UNIT 11 Food and Food Shopping
Use of RUN-OUT and DEPLETE (for containers)
Negatives of modals: CAN’T and WON’T
Use of NONE to show no quantity and as a negative: SEE” NONE, HEAR” NONE, UNDERSTAND” NONE
Fingerspelled abbreviations: L-B, 0-Z, D-0-Z, T-S-P
Classifiers CL: G and CL: BB to show thickness, width, and depth
1-DOLLAR incorporating numbers 2 to 10
Use of BLANK with the dollar amount
1-CENT incorporating numbers

UNIT 12 Offering and Declining
Non-inflecting form of HELP
Use of BREAKDOWN, SHUTDOWN, WEAR-OUT, BREAK
Structures for declining

UNIT 13 More Ways to Express Yourself
Ways to express satisfaction
Conditional sentences
Asking about someone: ALL-RIGHT? etc
Use of GONE and DIE
Structures to express emotional or physical states

UNIT 14 Experiences and C!:l.rrent Activity
Classifiers as quantifiers: CL:44, CL:55, etc
FINISH as conjunction
More conjunctions: WRONG, HAPPEN, FIND, FRUSTRATED, HIT
Number incorporation in LAST-YEAR, NEXT-YEAR, etc
Structures for asking what happened: WHAT’S-UP? etc
Structures for commenting on competence or expertise

UNIT 15 Future Plans and Obligations
Use of NOTHING-TO-IT
More verb pairs: GET-IN/GET-OUT, etc
Structures for indicating an obligation: APPOINTMENT, PROMISE, DUTY

UNIT 16 Directions and Instructions
Commonly used fingerspelled abbreviations: D-S and P-0
Use of body to show the change in direction
Use of apostrophe-S
Use of LOCALE
Locational relationships using chaining of classifiers
Use of CL: CC* *

UNIT 17 Suggestions and Advice
Use of BORED
Forms of EVERY-MONTH, EVERY-YEAR
Confirming head nods and headshakes
Use of APPROXIMATELY with time, age, and money
Structures for giving advice preceded by SHOULD, BETTER, ADVISE, WARN, SUGGEST, MAYBE

UNIT 18 Attitudes and Opinions
Verbs that change movement to indicate TWO, EACH, ALL
More ways to express opinions
Ways to express opposing values
Quantifiers with count and non-count nouns

UNIT 19 Recreational Activities
REPEATEDLY inflection of verbs, with facial adverbs
CONTINUALLY inflection of verbs, with facial adverbs
Use of CHAT, SIGN-TALK, and SIGN-FLUENTLY
Plural forms by reduplication

UNIT 20 Travel-Places and Experiences
Other verbs showing subject and object: JOIN and SAY-OKAY
REPEATEDLY inflection of adjectives
CONTINUALLY inflection of adjectives
VERY inflection of adjectives

UNIT 21 Occupations and Professions
Use of agent suffix for some professions
Rhetorical questions
Use of UNDERSTAND to precede a qualification, condition, or stipulation
Use of GET-REGULARLY

UNIT 22 The Body, Health, and Emergencies
Use of body pronoun
Use of PAIN
Use of NEVER and NOTHING as denials

UNIT 23 Current Events
Reduplication in different locations
Clause as topic
Use of WORSE

UNIT 24 How Things Are Done
Classifier predicates showing the manner of flow: CL:44=t and CL:4l
Distance from one point to another using CL:1-TO-CL:1
Questions about measurement: HOW-MUCH, etc

CONTENTS Culture Notes:

Using first and last names in introductions
DEAF, Deaf people’s term for themselves
Difference between WHERE LIVE? and WHERE FROM?
Saying EXCUSE-ME when walking between two people
Flashing lights to get attention and other ways to get attention
Asking and giving information about a person’s family background
Establishing whether hearing members of a family sign or not
Schools for the Deaf
DIYs, pagers, and email
Captioned video, TV, films
Deaf clubs
Bowling leagues
Deaf people’s communicative strategies with non-signers

About The Authors:

Tom Humphries is Associate Director of the Teacher Education Program and also teaches in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. He is currently coordinating a program to train teachers of deaf children using a bilingual approach. Before this, he taught at Gallaudet University in the Department of English for several years and later served as an Associate Dean for the San Diego Community College District where he coordinated the development of an ASL program and an interpreter-training program. He holds a Ph.D. in Cross-Cultural Communication and Language Learning. Dr. Humphries is co-author with Carol Padden of Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture and several other books and articles related to ASL and the culture of Deaf people.

Carol Padden is a Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego where she teachers courses on language, culture, and media. She is a graduate of Georgetown University and received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California, San Diego. Her recent research includes studies of reading development in young deaf children and she has written extensively about the cultural lives of Deaf people in the United States. She received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, in addition to numerous other awards and grants for her work. In addition to the books she has co-authored with Tom Humphries, she has published several other books and articles on American Sign Language structure. Humphries & Padden (Learning American Sign Language, 2e).

Reviews About The Ebook:

  • James Metz:
    Purchased for my granddaughter. She just enrolled in ASL continuing education class. She learned some signing while in high school and then they discontinued the class due to budget cuts and she wants to complete both levels. She loves signing Signing Naturally Units 1-6.
  • Kimberly G:
    Great book. The spiral-bound only covers 2/3 of the book leaving out the middle section so it is a little floppy when carried. I also suggest using the DVD that works with this book. the fast shipping was great! Happy signing!
  • Kelly Goodman:
    This book is easy to follow. My daughter & I took a basic signing class at our local college as she wanted to teach her baby how to sign so we could understand what she wanted before she had learned to speak. Not only did we learn sign language, but my granddaughter picked up on it very quickly and was signed by the time she was 5 months old. It’s nice to be able to communicate — even if it is just a word or phrase at that age! She was & continues to be a very easy-going child. My grandson was taught to sign at 2 after an illness thwarted his speech. He picked up on it quickly (thank God) as it would get very frustrated when we didn’t know what he wanted. Now he can sign and the frustration, tears, etc. have all but ceased.
  • Eljay:
    The text is solid as a teaching resource but not something I would recommend. The DVD is poorly produced as an educational tool; the actors sign much too quickly for beginners, and it becomes a joke to students instead of a resource. Therefore, the DVD is unhelpful at best and harmful if you consider the demoralizing effects of failure and frustration on student motivation to learn. This problem is particularly important because many of the picture definition entries in the text are difficult to decipher, and the DVD is little help in that regard. The text is not very engaging. It is comprised mostly of grammar rules and definition entries, with too few learning exercises to employ and practice the material. The indexes in the back of the book are poorly done for a textbook. It outperforms the other “go-to” text people seem to use, Vista Signing Naturally (which has a lot of problems), but it’s not a strong text. Neither text seems grounded in the foundations of theory on education, or uses what is known from research in education and psychology about learning and memory, foreign language acquisition, etc. Lastly, it’s expensive for what you get, especially the DVD Learning American Sign Language 2nd Edition.
  • Harold Goodman:
    I am the author of the Michel Thomas courses to learn spoken Mandarin Chinese. When my ASL first assigned this text and I received it from Amazon, I thought, How will I ever learn ASL from this? I am now in the third week of classes. The teacher is OK but the book along with the DVD is better. Honestly, if I had to only learn from the teacher, I would know precious little. She is deaf and it is very hard for me and my fellow hearing students to understand her. I found another student to study without class. We both review the materials for each unit in this book on our own. Then we meet before class after we have watched the relevant DVD portion on our own a few times, and go through the exercises together Signing Naturally Units 7-12.You cannot learn ASL from a book even with a DVD.

    However, what you do learn can be corrected by someone who knows this language. Feedback is essential.

    Go to a deaf church service, work with a deaf person via skype, find someone who can give you feedback. It will pay off.

    Some of the drawings in the book were a bit confusing. I found a book, Perigee Visual dictionary of signing, which details the signs and, best of all, gives mnemonics or memory aids to understand them and get them to stick.

    The more I go through the book, the more confusing the pictures are. If you Google ASL you will find several sites where the gestures are shown via free videos. Use them in conjunction with the book and DVD. I wonder how anyone can make sense of ASL solely from this book.

    There is no way to learn without practicing.

    Do a little each day. A little is worth a lot more than a lot infrequently.

    The book has exercised. Get to where you can comfortably express each sentence.

    Spend a little time reviewing the past lessons, learning new material, and getting more familiar with ASL each day. It takes time so don’t get discouraged at the beginning. This is a purely visual language and, for some, this may initially prove somewhat confusing.

    Do whatever you can do. That is enough even if you don’t believe me!

    Be aware of how ASL expresses things. ASL does not equal English. It is a separate language and has its grammar and syntax. This book will give you enough of this to get started.

    Above all, do not be too greedy in learning lots of stuff.

    Get to where you know the core vocabulary of signs. Use this over and over until it is second nature.

    Not even all deaf signers know all the signs.

    Learn to fingerspell first of all. Then you can fingerspell whatever sign you don’t know.

    Make sure you use facial expressions. Without them it is like you are speaking in a monotone; boring.

    Slowly, little by little, you will learn this wonderful, expressive language.

  • Diane Hoover:
    Some of the pictures I need to pay attention to as it can be hard to tell exactly how your hands should be placed. And the examples of conversations you practice do not reflect everyday conversations so it is awkward and not that applicable. Otherwise, I have found this to be a great resource for learning signs.
  • Bruce Dingman:
    Good basic book for learning American Sign Language. I would recommend this book to anyone who interacts with the public in any capacity. The deaf community would greatly appreciate your effort. My daughter is now an ASL interpreter (recent assignments including hospital, court, GHURA, prison). My wife has taken several courses and I am trying to learn because my wife frequently loses her voice and has to communicate by a sign.
  • Rebekah Lewis:
    I love this ebook. The great foundation of signs – though some are a little outdated or not used in my area. Sometimes it’s hard to understand a sign from a book, but there are plenty of resources on the internet, or live people, that can help you sharpen your skills. As with any language book, the text itself will not make you fluent, but it will help set you up to communicate effectively.
  • LoreleiLouise:
    I received my ebook fast. After looking through it for an hour and studying the first pages, I learned how the book was written. Several learning aids are included in the pictures and once you study what the aids do, you realize how much thought went into this book. I intend on taking a formal class using this book. But until that time I am going to begin on my own so I have a head start. I have read reviews from people who say that the pictures are too hard to understand. They did not take the time to read the explanation for the pictures. This is a fine book and I cannot wait to get into it. I intend to become certified as an Interpreter and this book will give me a great start. This is a book for people who are serious about the study, not those who want learning and understanding handed to them on a platter.
  • PumpkinToes:
    This book arrived exactly when promised, and the pages were in good shape. The cover was a little damaged and there were some notes in pencil and pen that was not disclosed, but overall as good as can be expected! Thanks!
  • Claudia:
    A wonderful workbook if you’d like to improve your ASL skills.
  • Jessica:
    This was a required textbook for an ASL course I took in college. I loved learning sign language and this book helped a lot in that process. This is one of the few textbooks I kept and it is one of the few that I pull out occasionally to look over again.
  • GLAM:
    I needed this book for my ASL 1&2 classes and it’s been such a blessing to have this book and to have bought it for a reasonable price!
  • Sarah:
    A good book for learning some basics in ASL. My edition though doesn’t have the DVD.

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